Jean Jacques Rousseau

Emilius and Sophia; or, A new system of education.

Emilius and Sophia; or, A new system of education.

Displayed is an early English translation of Emile, one of Rousseau’s most well known and influential works. In Emile, Rousseau uses the structure of a tutor teaching a pupil to lay out an educational curriculum that embraces enlightenment ideals. Emile complements Rousseau’s Social Contract by providing a guide for how an individual could be educated to become a successful member of society while preserving what made them an intrinsically good person. 

Jean Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778)
Emilius and Sophia; or, A new system of education.
London: T. Becket and P.A. de Hondt, 1763.

Confessions; the anonymous translation into English of 1783 & 1790

Confessions; the anonymous translation into English of 1783 & 1790.

Rousseau’s autobiography provides a personal perspective on his life, literary works, and the historical period during which he lived. This work is particularly relevant to the Encyclopédie for Rousseau’s description of his relationship with Diderot, which ranges from high praise to bitter criticism. This variation follows the trajectory of their fifteen year friendship and eventual falling out. Rousseau was actively involved in the philosophe social circle and regularly interacted with those working on the Encyclopédie. The edition of Confessions on display, published by the Limited Editions Club, features illustrations of major figures that Rousseau mentions in his work, including many of the contributors to the Encyclopédie.

Jean Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778)
Confessions; the anonymous translation into English of 1783 & 1790.
New York: Limited Editions Club, 1955.